Spring news

Happy spring, everyone. Some exciting things to report as we close out this month:

The International Living Future Institute conference is next week, and ILFI has designated the Pollinator Pathway as this year’s Legacy Project. Sarah Bergmann will be leading a working tour of the project; we’ll be preparing the Pollinator Pathway for spring bloom. This event is sold out, but please feel free to join our mailing list for future events.

Additionally, Bergmann will be speaking twice at the ILFI conference. Here are the details:

April 1: 15 Minutes of Brilliance
April 3: Net Positive Biodiversity session, with Deb Guenther of Mithun and Nicole Stern of Biohabitats

Looking forward to seeing you at the event.
Tickets: http://living-future.org/unconference2015/program

Alan Maskin of Olson Kundig recently shared some of the products of his wide-ranging, creative mind and made a nice mention of the Pollinator Pathway. Thanks, Alan!
http://blog.novedge.com/2015/03/the-edge-alan-maskin-rooftop-design-at-olson-kundig.html

AIA Urban Design Forum

Happy to share that Sarah Bergmann will be speaking at the AIA Urban Design Forum next month, on March 25th.

AIA_UDF

Hello, 2015

Hello, everyone. The Pollinator Pathway takes its annual break on the physical project until March, but all is busy behind the scenes. Some great news to share, is that the Pollinator Pathway has been designated a Legacy Project by the International Living Future Institute for 2015. I have other exciting news coming down the pipeline, and will share more soon. Thanks to you, the community that has sprung up around this unusual public design project, for your support, good ideas and enthusiasm over the years. The project has just turned 7, and I couldn’t be prouder. Thanks, all of you.
-Sarah Bergmann

Corson Building

Fall News

The Pollinator Pathway has had a busy spring and summer, and we have some news:
-We are excited to share that Sarah Bergmann will be speaking at TEDx next month about the project. http://www.tedxrainier.com/speakers/sarah-bergmann/
-Olson Kundig Architects collaborated with Sarah Bergmann last month, putting their creative force behind imagining solutions for a section of the second project. The designs, ranging from impossible to practical, will be curated into the enormous visual book that will accompany this project. Some photos from the session: http://on.fb.me/1vDZszZ
-Lectures and work days: Bergmann had the pleasure of working with both Seattle University (art history) and the Aldo Leopold Foundation (ecology) via lectures and work on the Pollinator Pathway, in what has become a growing work-and-learn lecture series on the project.
-We have had a wonderful anonymous monthly contribution that has helped our Gardener care for the project. Thank you! To help keep this public design project beautiful for the year 2015, you can donate here:
Direct financial donations can be made here:
http://www.pollinatorpathway.com/support/
Here is where to pledge time, future funding or materials:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1S77Fd9sYqRPdVSMLQj10ZHg-sDTK4e5J-LR81ut5Ym4/viewform?usp=send_form

 

Thanks for your support, friends

The Pollinator Pathway recently sent out a newsletter asking for support in pledges, financial contributions and materials for the 2015 year. Thank you, to everyone who contributed and pledged. With your help, nearly $16K was raised in match toward the 2015 year over just a few days, and more are still coming in– thank you!

There’s still time to pledge or donate. I so appreciate your support of this project, and every contribution helps the Pollinator Pathway succeed in the 2015 year. Any amount you pledge for the year makes a difference to the project.

Direct financial donations can be made here:
http://www.pollinatorpathway.com/support/
Here is where to pledge time, future funding or materials:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1S77Fd9sYqRPdVSMLQj10ZHg-sDTK4e5J-LR81ut5Ym4/viewform?usp=send_form

Best wishes,

Sarah Bergmann

Bergmann and Capitol Hill Housing Partnering on Second Pollinator Pathway

Bergmann is excited to announce a new partnership with Capitol Hill Housing to make a brand new, second official Pollinator Pathway– as well as complete the first. Seattle University is also a partner on the project– and UW’s Green Futures Research and Design Lab will be engaged with the pre-visioning process.

The first ‘rule’ of The Pollinator Pathway is that it has to connect two green spaces– and this plan may well connect three. We’re still developing the route for Pollinator Pathway Two, but the aim is to connect Seattle University’s campus to Volunteer Park, running along 11th Avenue, where it’ll go right through the Capitol Hill Eco District and the emerging Arts District.

Bergmann’s vision for the Pollinator Pathway is to rebind and strengthen isolated green spaces across multiple scales and landscape types to achieve lasting, networked habitat. The Pollinator Pathway concept is simple but the important work is in the details– it is a team effort that requires strong collaborative partnerships and long-term planning. A longstanding community development organization like Capitol Hill Housing is a natural partner for the expansion of the project, especially within the context of an EcoDistrict.

Here’s some recent coverage of the project:
http://www.capitolhilltimes.com/2014/06/pollinator-pathway-scheduled-span-along-11th-avenue/

Bergmann and Capitol Hill Housing to Partner on a New Pollinator Pathway

For Immediate Release

Bergmann and Capitol Hill Housing to Partner on a New Pollinator Pathway™ 

Seattle, WA — A busy new thoroughfare will connect Seattle University’s campus with Volunteer Park. That’s the hope of Pollinator Pathway founder Sarah Bergmann and Capitol Hill Housing’s EcoDistrict Director Joel Sisolak. Bergmann and Capitol Hill Housing are teaming up with Seattle University and the University of Washington to begin pre-design and pre-development of a new 1.5 mile Pollinator Pathway for native bees, butterflies, birds and other pollinators between Seattle University’s grounds and the trees and gardens of Volunteer Park. Capitol Hill Housing and Bergmann announced the initiative as part of National Pollinator Week.

“We’re looking at 11th Avenue,” says Sisolak. “We like that it includes the eastern edge of Cal Anderson Park and the green space by Lowell Elementary School before reaching Volunteer Park. It also could be a central piece of the new Arts District being planned for Capitol Hill.”

Sisolak and Bergmann hope that the residents and property owners along 11th Ave will like the idea, too. “We are just beginning to talk with stakeholders about the north-south route,” Sisolak notes. “We hope they’ll embrace the concept like the folks on Columbia Street have.”

The project on 11th Ave would be the second official Pollinator Pathway. The partners are also committed to completing the first Pollinator Pathway, the original concept project started by Bergmann in 2008. Currently 20 gardens on Columbia Street comprise the first Pathway between Seattle University and Nora’s Wood, a pocket park in the Madrona neighborhood; another 40 gardens will complete the project.

Often called a New Audubon project, the Pollinator Pathway merges art, design, planning and science, and is getting national attention in urban design and ecology circles. Bergmann has received a Genius Award from The Stranger and the Betty Bowen Award (administered by the Seattle Art Museum) for her work. With local and national recognition has come increased interest from local and national entities in developing new projects, and Bergmann is working with partners to institutionalize the project’s requirements for connectivity, ecology, urban density, long term planning and design.

Bergmann’s vision is to rebind and strengthen isolated green spaces across multiple scales and landscape types to achieve lasting, networked habitat – connecting parks to parks, and working across cities to develop an ecological connection between cities, farms and wilderness. The Pollinator Pathway concept is simple but the important work is in the details. “This is a team effort that requires strong collaborative partnerships and long-term planning. A longstanding community development organization like Capitol Hill Housing is a natural partner for the expansion of the project, especially within the context of an EcoDistrict,” says Bergmann.

A north-south Pollinator Pathway through the Capitol Hill EcoDistrict would expand the model to include much denser land uses. While the Columbia Street corridor has primarily single family homes where gardens are hosted by homeowners in planting strips, an 11th Avenue Pathway would be integrated with small commercial, institutional, mixed use and apartment buildings.

“It’s an interesting design challenge,” says Nancy Rottle about the north-south route. Rottle, a landscape architect and director of the University of Washington Green Futures Lab, will encourage Master of Landscape Architecture students to assist with pre-design and community engagement activities associated with the second Pollinator Pathway. In a letter of support for the project, Rottle connects it with Seattle’s Olmsted legacy.

The Olmsted Brothers firm of Brookline, Massachusetts was hired in 1902 to create a comprehensive plan for parks in the young City of Seattle. Many of Seattle’s most beloved parks were designed by the firm, including Capitol Hill’s Cal Anderson and Volunteer Parks. The Olmsted Plan emphasized “naturalistic parkland” and a series of boulevards that would connect Seattle’s parks as a city-wide network of green spaces.

A Pollinator Pathway on 11th Avenue would add an ecological layer to the Olmsted strategy: reconnecting two Olmsted Parks and creating beautiful habitat for people and pollinators, while creating an iconic project within the heart of Capitol Hill.

“Will the neighborhood embrace the second Pollinator Pathway? We think so,” says Sisolak. “Who doesn’t like flowers, birds and butterflies?”

Lecture and working day at Seattle University

Bergmann recently presented a lecture “The Pollinator Pathway as Art, Work, Ecology, Science, Urban Planning” at professor Kenneth Allan’s Space & Site course in Art History at Seattle University recently. Following the lecture, students joined Bergmann on the Pollinator Pathway project to tend to the project’s gardens.

SUClass

We are hiring for a Gardener + Volunteer Coordinator Position

The Pollinator Pathway seeks a friendly and responsible person for its Gardener +
Volunteer Coordinator position.

The position will be split between two primary tasks: organizing and overseeing our volunteer program (through outreach, coordination
and planned weeding dates) and independently caring for the project (overseeing the gardens, preparing soils and planting areas, weeding beds between planting and maintenance events, communicating with homeowners about their individual gardens, and monitoring the health of the gardens overall) for the duration of the position.

This is a one day per week position from April – November 2014.
$15 per hour.

We seek someone interested in creative urban space reuse with extensive experience and comfort working with volunteers and the public. The ideal candidate will possess advanced gardening skills and a working knowledge of native plants and pollinators. Must have own vehicle.

The Gardener/Volunteer Coordinator will be responsible for:
-Organizing and leading a weekly planting and maintenance work party.
-Coordinating volunteer efforts and assisting volunteers in planting and maintaining the gardens.
-Acting as technical advisor and spokesperson for educational event days, leading demonstrations of planting techniques and answering questions.
-Independently overseeing the health of the planted gardens for the duration of contract.
-Weeding planted beds, both with and without the assistance of volunteers or homeowners.
-Communicating recommendations to homeowners in order to ensure overall health of planted areas.
-Responding to community member’s garden and pollinator inquiries.

Please send a resume and a short cover letter outlining your experience and interest by April 4 to: info@pollinatorpathway.com

Woolly Mammoth Diets

The project is still on break, but I’ll be posting from time to time as I pick up interesting and relevant articles in the midst of my work. Here’s one such article, on the diets of woolly mammoths, which, it turns out, were comprised primarily of flowers.

http://n.pr/ME2YHN